Tools for an Organized Job Search

16/10/2013 § 15 Comments

“Job search prep” has been on my To Do list since mid-summer. I’m an aspiring academic librarian graduating in May and I know that the job hunt can be a very long and involved process. I’ve been updating my resume and keeping track of job ads that interest me in an attempt to prepare ahead of time. But now as fall whips by, “prep” is looking more and more like actual searching. I have Rafiki’s words from The Lion King echoing in my head as motivation: “It is time!”

There are so many resources available for job-seekers and, as with most things on the web, the volume can be pretty overwhelming. My aim here is to round up some of the tools and resources I’m utilizing so far, and to open the floor for more tips and sharing.

Image via photologue flickrCC

Image via photologue flickrCC

1. An RSS Reader. I did not fully appreciated the power of an RSS reader until I began to look at job adds. Essentially, RSS (rich site summary) readers allow you to aggregate “feeds” of content from various websites. So, instead of obsessively checking every site that posts jobs, you can check your RSS reader for new content in one place. I’m currently using Digg, which a friend recommended to me, and I think it’s clean and easy to use. There are, of course, lots of other options out there.

This page has information on library job sites. Try your regional ALA chapter and library school sites as well. Unfortunately, not every job site offers their content as an RSS feed, but it’s a great place to start.

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Ebook

07/10/2013 § Leave a comment

In August 2013 we released The HLS Guide to Library School, an open access ebook including both old and new posts written by current and alumni hackers (and a few guest writers, too). To learn more about our motivation for compiling an ebook, you can read the ebook introduction.

You can access the ebook here:

Happy reading!

Hack Library School Ebook

09/09/2013 § 10 Comments

We’ve been keeping a little secret. Over the summer, we began the process of compiling content for our very own Hack Library School ebook. We’ve recently finished and decided it’s time to share The HLS Guide to Library School with the world.

The ebook is a whopping 328 pages of content: both old and new posts, written by current and alumni hackers (and a few guest writers, too). To learn more about our motivation for compiling an ebook, you can read our introduction.

We’re so excited to share this with you. We can’t wait to hear what you think!

You can access the ebook here:

Goodbye Library School, Hello High School

29/08/2013 § Leave a comment

Well, this is it, kids: my time in library school is over, and so too ends my time writing for Hack Library School. This is so long, this is farewell, this is auf wiedersehen and adieu. This is also when I’m supposed to write a nice post summing up my time here, or my time as a library student, or something like that. But I’m finding that a bit difficult, because at least for me the end of library school has segued straight into professional librarianship. So while on the one hand it feels as though everything has changed, it also feels like the road I’m on is the same one I’ve been on since my grad school orientation.

This has nothing to do with anything, I just liked it. Image by samdecle, licensed through Flickr.

This has nothing to do with anything, I just liked it. Image by samdecle, licensed through Flickr.

Back in the summer ending my first year in library school, I made a plan to transition to Boston. I had no leads there; I knew precisely one person, who was not a librarian. I was giving up a decent amount of library cred back in Portland in exchange for what I hoped would be a wider array of opportunities, but there was no question it was a gamble. I figured I would find a nice practicum somewhere in Boston, head back east, and somehow that would lead to a job. To my own immense surprise, that’s exactly what happened… I found and landed the practicum, moved back east, and at the very end my practicum– just as things were starting to look a bit dire, as though perhaps I’d made a mistake — I got a job. The day I flew back to Portland for my final capstone presentation, not an hour after my plane had landed, I received the email offering me the position. I can’t begin to express the relief and gratitude I felt that day.

Here’s the thing, though: the job I’m doing is not a job I’d ever have guessed I would do. I’ve always hedged my bets by following the digital librarianship track, but in my heart of hearts I was most interested in how people use technology in the library, and in teaching them how to master all these amazing new tools that technology has given us. Actually getting to do that seemed like a distant dream, though, to be won only through years of part-time and contract gigs, fighting for my chance to teach, or being turned aside and into some other track entirely. Then one day I found a job posting for a Digital Literacy Librarian at a boarding school of all outlandish places, and figured I might as well give it a shot. A week later, I went to interview. A week after that, I got the job offer. This week — only a month after first spotting that ad — I’m on campus for faculty orientation. It has all been startling and thrilling and exhausting, but I have no doubt that this is the next right step on my road.

So here’s my advice to you, as a old hand at library school and a total rookie as a professional librarian:

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EveryLibrary/HLS Intern Update #1

27/08/2013 § 1 Comment

This post is part 1 of 2 from our EveryLibrary/Hack Library School intern Mallory Arents. Stay tuned for her second post in September!

Okay, so here’s the thing: working with EveryLibrary is a little scary.  Scary not in the way of shark infested hurricanes or flesh-eating viruses, but rather because the organization is kind of a big deal. EveryLibrary works on building voter support for libraries. In its first six months, EveryLibrary worked with five campaigns and consulted with about a dozen libraries in planning ballot measures for next year. EveryLibrary is unique in the library advocacy world because it directly funds local voter education campaigns, provides campaign consultancy, and adds capacity to local ballot committees. Every dollar that EveryLibrary has given to campaign committees so far has equated to $370 in public funding for libraries. That is 1.85 million dollars in public funding in just 6 months: UNREAL. Libraries are prohibited from engaging in political fundraising and direct voter advocacy because they are public entities. When it’s those very institutions on the ballot, who will champion their cause?  As the first national library Political Action Committee, EveryLibrary steps in where libraries themselves can’t. See what I mean about being a big deal?

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